The Seven Spiritual Laws of Supeheroes - Deepak Chopra with Gotham Chopra
“Superheroes have learned to live without false boundaries between the personal and the universal. Too often we identify only with an ego that drags around a bag of skin and bones. This then becomes a socially conditioned boundary that leads to a limited sense of self.” -- From the book













Pop culture and archetypal myth meets Chopra’s characteristic chewy prose in his newest book The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes, co-authored with his son and founder of Liquid Comics, Gotham Chopra.

Although only 167-pages, this books packs a quantum KAPOW! by showing readers the connection between superhero strengths and the Universal Field that mere humans can access, channel and embody for an integrated earthly existence.

According to Chopra—who uses diverse examples ranging from Silver Surfer to Icarus, Ram to Zeus, Jehovah to Spider-Man, Storm to Daredevil, Jesus to Superman—deities, legends and superheroes contain both the projections and potentialities of humans. By reading and studying their archetypal stories, we can learn what makes them “super”, understand their fatal flaws, discover what orchestrates their triumph over darkness (whether from within or without) and apply these quantum lessons to our own life journey.

And, in The Seven Laws of Superheroes, Chopra connects the dots for readers, so even those who may be clueless about Doctor Strange, Beyonder, Lord Ravan and the like can understand the import of their stories for human potential and, indeed, global transformation.

So what are The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes? They are:

1. The Law of Balance
2. The Law of Transformation
3. The Law of Power
4. The Law of Love
5. The Law of Creativity
6. The Law of Intention
7. The Law of Transcendence

To give you a taste of some of the BOFF! wisdom in this book, here’s a few of my favorite quotes:

• Superheroes understand that the moment they label or define themselves, they limit themselves.

• In superhero lore, the shadow often appears as the supervillain, but don’t be fooled. In truth, the supervillain is just the superhero who’s been sabotaged by an imbalance in the self…Maintaining that you do not have a shadow is actually denial of it, or standing in total darkness, cut off from the world. If you stand in the light, as superheroes do, then you will always see your shadow. With this awareness, the bright light of higher consciousness can keep an eye on the shadow saboteur.

• Superheroes like Silver Surfer don’t just tap into the qualities of higher consciousness; they embody them. Like the great prophets, their selflessness comprises the highest ideals that we value as a civilization. When they look upon the world and everyone in it, they see themselves and ask, “How can I make things better?’

• Superheroes don’t have to solve all of life’s mysteries, because they ARE life’s mysteries. With his knowledge, superheroes learn to do less and accomplish more and ultimately do nothing and accomplish everything.

• The superhero is independent of the good and bad opinions of others.

In less adept hands, correlating comic book heroes and mythological greats with practical self-help, spiritual truths and human actualization might result in a superficial mash-up of commercial (rather than cosmic) proportions. SPLATT!

But not with Deepak and Gotham steering the galactic superhero ship! No, we get the best of comics and culture—yes, both commercial and cosmic—but this father/son team demonstrates how we can reinvent our individual and collective stories to awaken dormant excellence, activate latent skills, intend for a better future and then DO SOMETHING to make our world a better place.

How cool is that?

ZOWIE!

To get your copy of The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes from Amazon, click here. To get the Kindle version, click here.

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Content copyright © by Janet Boyer. All rights reserved. This review was written by Janet Boyer. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission.